Protection From Putter Rust

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joshuap

Guest
with my putters i am going to include Choji oil and a cleaning cloth

It is a light machine/mineral oil and clove oil mix. Around 99% machine/mineral and 1% clove

The clove part alone would cause rust but in the small amounts it helps keep moisture off the metal and is actually used more for the appealing odor it gives off.

Choji Oil has used to keep and maintain Japanese swords for centuries, especially ones with high carbon content.

So far it has worked really well on all the black ox proto putters
 

drewspin

Active member
dwcheung said:
I hope people are still reading this. After playing my dbcm, I decided to oil it with some eezox. When I decided to wipe off some excess oil on the face, the red paintfill on the face where it says "m/p 14 of 25" showed on the tissue I was using. The paint is still on the face but should I have not used eezox on this putter?
It is a stainless steel putter coated in PVD. No need for eezox or any other rust protectant on it. Store it dry, and avoid sanded top-dressed greens if you care about the minor scratches to the PVD coating.

With respect to removing of the paintfill... the paint may have come off the PVD surface more easily, and you may have used too much eezox.
 

jr

Administrator
Staff member
There is a reason why I recommended the silicone spray at the beginning of this thread.
 

drewspin

Active member
I'd be willing to bet a bottle of paintl that if you liberally applied some silicone spray to a PVD coated putter you could disloge some paintfill with that too. PVD is some pretty impervious stuff. No need to treat those putters.
 
P

playing in the shade

Guest
New here. Been rummaging through the threads and found this one. Thought some of you might find this comparison of various corrosion protectants interesting:

http://www.ctmuzzleloaders.com/ctml_experiments/corrosion/corrosion2.html

Personally, I use Ballistol on everything. Found it through black powder shooting. It is especially good at neutralizing and stopping bronze rot in its tracks on the old Ping putters. Even softened up a stiff old leather Sunday bag with it. Smells like the devil for a while, but works.
 
H

hebron1427

Guest
Any thoughts on this product? It was 2.5x the cost of the next silicone spray, but I figured "pure" might be worth it, given some of the thoughts on this page.
 

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sevenfourate

Devotee of OCD
hebron1427 said:
Any thoughts on this product? It was 2.5x the cost of the next silicone spray, but I figured "pure" might be worth it, given some of the thoughts on this page.
Not that particular make,but ive been using 'pure' silicone spray on my Black Oxide wall-hangers since i got them. Like your the one i bought was about the most expensive i saw for sale.

I liberally spray on once in a while,wipe the excess with a rag and re-hang ! Ive not had any issues at all with it.
 

rickp

Putterhead 0426
Guys,

I have been useing the "Blaster Silicone Lube" for a while with no problems on 3 different finishes, black oxide, dark oil & naked (bare polished carbon steel). The paint fill does not seem to be harmed in any way BUT these putters do not see wet, damp or fertilized greens either.
 

rookieblue7

New member
Another couple of good products that work better than the originally listed silicone spray are as follows:

CRC SP-350. It's a silicone based spray that also has a rust inhibitor. Works great.

The other is Eezox Silicone Gun oil. This, IMO, is the best stuff on the market. If it's good enough for gun collectors that own $50,000 guns, it's good enough for my putters. Great, great product. I tested it by applying it on a carbon steel, raw putter I was refinishing before any finish was applied (raw metal) and putting it outside for the heavy rain we had that lasted all night and then letting it air dry. There were zero rust spots on it after it dried. Great stuff.
 

jr

Administrator
Staff member
One thing that guns and putters do not have in common is that guns do not regularly come in contact with fertilizers and pesticides and other chemicals and putters do. Hence you have to taken into considerations how the ingredients in the product you are using will react when they come in contact with said fertilizers and pesticides and other chemicals. It has been my experience that many of the products people use on guns and other things contain petroleum in some form and that petroleum products do not react well with the fertilizers and pesticides and other chemicals found on the putting green. The reaction can be something as little as some discoloration to the putters finish to actual pitting of the metal.

I have used the original product listed at the beginning of this thread for 4 or 5 years on all types and brands of putters that were being used on greens that had just been treated. I have had said fertilizers and pesticides and other chemicals sticking to the putter because of moisture on the greens and have never had any ill effects on my putters.

If it aint broke it don't need fixn!
 

rookieblue7

New member
I've been using Eezox and the SP-350 for years as well, 8 to be exact. I've never had one rust problem, course I also wipe every putter I've ever owned before putting it back in the cover and back into the bag along with using these products. Different strokes for different folks, I suppose. As long as it works, it doesn't really matter. The SP-350, to me, is a superior product than CRC's regular silicone spray, because it does have the rust inhibitor that the silicone spray doesn't have. Eezox, to me, is superior to both. That's in my trials here in humid North Georgia. Course I'm that guy that removes the cover from my putter once I get home and cleans then sprays it again.
 

TMAC

Member
A lot of good information and products on this thread. The main things you need to do with a carbon putter is to keep them wiped down and as dry as possible while playing, after you get home wipe the putter down good with an oil cloth or silicone, and keep stored in a dry environment (with a coat of oil / silicone on it when not being used).
I also like Jr's idea of taking a spare, dry headcover with you when you play and put it on the putter when you are done with your round - especially if you are playing when it's raining / damp, or in locations of the country that are humid and/or near the ocean.
I've used a Scotty Cameron oil cloth for years, but you can get the same results with a gun oil product (like Eezox) and putting it on a rag. Baby oil also works good, but the main issue I have with oils is it leaves a "wet" putter that attracts dirt, grass, debris, fertilizer, etc when you go out and game the stick. I will keep my putters oiled during the off season but when I'm playing every week I like to wipe my gamers down with a silicone spray. Many silicones will dry nicely (but still protect the putter) and not have that "wet" surface that oils can leave behind. However, DO NOT use products like WD-40, They have chemicals that will take the finish/paint off the putter. Look for electrical or food grade silicones.
There have been several mentioned here already that are good products.
Here is one that I have been using for a couple years with excellent results.
 

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Rob McHugh

Try to be the Person Your Dog Thinks You Are
Hey guys, this is a great thread but I have a question. I normally use baby oil on my wall hangers and a Cameron silicon cloth on my gamers. With that in mind, this won't make a lot of diffirence to me but I read on a TCC post somewhere with Bill Vogeney (Vog) saying the qickest way to wreck the finish on an original Oil Can (I have 5 of these so my ears pricked up) is to use the silicon cloth! I have only used baby oil on them ever since and they don't leave the house anyway so there is no chance of fertilizer sticking to them.

I know Bill is THE authority on Cameron putters per se but what about this advice? I have never heard this from anyone else and am wondering if any of you guys have had trouble when applying a silicon product to an Oil Can finish. Thanks.

Kind regards,
Rob
 

TMAC

Member
Rob -

I think the main issue with the oil can finish (and I have a few oil can putters myself) is the RUBBING. Oil can is a very finicky, delicate finish and can literally be rubbed off if you apply too much pressure. Of course, if you use a harmful product like WD-40 and rub the surface, that will make it come off even quicker. As far as the Scotty oil cloths are concerned, I don't think it's the oils in the cloth that are having the harmful effect that Vog suggested. I honestly think it's rubbing the putter too much that causes the finish to be removed.
I have heard stories that Eezox, if left on the putter too long (like during the winter / off-season) can eat at the paint a bit, but I have not seen that personally. In the off-season, I will use the Cameron cloth on my carbon putters (lightly applied), and/or a Food-grade or Electrical-grade silicone spray, usually one of the CRC products if I can find it. The electrical grade CRC can is blue and the food-grade CRC can is green. They also say "electrical" and "food" on them. I just apply the product by spraying it directly on the putter head (making sure to get in the creases - like in the cavities) and give them a light wipe with a micro-fiber cloth.
 

Rob McHugh

Try to be the Person Your Dog Thinks You Are
Thanks TMAC. I was kind of thinking the same thing. I have had too many other reliable sources of knowledge like yourself and painter Steve tell me it is fine.
I am now going to try and find some food - grade silicon spray here in Sydney and do exactly as you say.
Thanks again mate. :)

Kind regards,
Rob
 

mds

Member
Hey guys,
What are the best (safest) non petroleum based silicone sprays for use on putters today and where can we buy them?
Please include photos of cans.
Thanks!
 
mds said:
Hey guys,
What are the best (safest) non petroleum based silicone sprays for use on putters today and where can we buy them?
Please include photos of cans.
Thanks!
I purchased Eezox to protect a few carbon putters but was advised after the fact that it was quite toxic and that I should handle with care.

A WRX member turned me on to Sentry Solutions Marine Tuf Cloth's as he was using them to protect a carbon Scotty. The cloth comes in a protective bag with lubricant applied. The lubricant dries quickly, is oil free, and is safe to handle. I wear a glove when I'm using the cloth as the lubricant stinks, but it dries quickly. Water beads on the surface of my putter after application. I still wipe down with a towel after use on wet greens and apply the cloth after each round, but don't think I need to.

Here's a link to the product that I purchased: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sentry-Solutions-TUF-CLOTH-2-Pk-1-Original-1-Marine-/331893491323?hash=item4d4664c67b:m:m93cbUcSplfz2n0waWBrZ4w
 
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