Affect of different putter grips?

mattc

New member
Is there a long standing thread on this topic? Can't find one and I'm curious about the community's thoughts on how much the type and weight affect the putter. I brought up shafts a while back and now they're getting a lot of interest. Curious how much discussion has gone on about grips. (Aside from those huge round grips that I've always thought were ridiculous)

Seems like the best putters on tour use pretty standard traditional sized grips or something close to it. I've recently gotten a new putter with a slightly larger profile grip. I've never liked changing putter grips because it pretty much becomes a new putter but this one's not going to work. How about just asking what your favorite grip is and why? How much of it is what you're used to?
 

Oneputt

Member
Grip weight can affect the balance of the putter quite a bit. For example, when the industry standard for putter head weight went from 320 to 350 grams, putter grip weights also increased, so that the putter head and grip may counter balance each other.
The shift to heavier heads and heavier grips also spawned the birth of wider diameter grips, which are currently popular both on Tour and for amateurs. The theory behind wider diameter grips is that the player will likely use less tension to hold it compared to a traditional slender profile grip. Also,
wider diameter grips may promote a more firm wrist stroke, which some people want.
But, Tiger Woods and Rickie Fowler, two of the world's best putters, still use old style light weight putter heads and slender profile small diameter grips, because they like the sense of touch , feel, feedback these grips offer them. Also, the slender profile grips promote wrist play and release of the putter head thru impact, which is something great putters usually want to do.
 

mattc

New member
Thank you for your thoughts Oneputt. I have a thin and close to traditional sized grip but likely heavier grip on my Lajosi DD201 but the leather grip on the Widebody Lajosi I own must be heavier as the head feels light. It's more of a wider diameter but almost paddle style. It's interesting to play with and I'm not going to pull it off right away but I could see making a move to a more traditional grip. I'm surprised there's not more discussion here on the topic. If you're going to fuss about a 1/2 degree of loft or lie and the head weight, the grip is probably just as important. I'd be curious to hear from anyone who's got a favorite that is close to standard size.
 

Oneputt

Member
Thank you for your thoughts Oneputt. I have a thin and close to traditional sized grip but likely heavier grip on my Lajosi DD201 but the leather grip on the Widebody Lajosi I own must be heavier as the head feels light. It's more of a wider diameter but almost paddle style. It's interesting to play with and I'm not going to pull it off right away but I could see making a move to a more traditional grip. I'm surprised there's not more discussion here on the topic. If you're going to fuss about a 1/2 degree of loft or lie and the head weight, the grip is probably just as important. I'd be curious to hear from anyone who's got a favorite that is close to standard size.
For for your Lajosi with the heavy grip , before taking off the grip you might want to put some lead tape on the sole, just to experiment and find out whether you like the new balance it has. If you put a little strip of painters tape on the sole first, then add the lead tape strips on top of that, later you will be able to remove all the tape without having put on the putter sole any marks.

My favorite grips are the Garsen Edge and the Garsen MAX. Most all brand putter grips have a flat top side, but these two Garsen models have a v-shaped top side, which means the player must adopt a particular grip technique (thumbs to the side rather than on top of the grip).
This grip design, combined with the technique needed for this grip, has truly helped my putting.Have a look at the Garsen web site here:

www.garsengolf.com
 

Golfluvzme

The little guy just working harder, ;-)
I'll throw out a situation that I ran into, this past Spring when I had a customer request a "longer grip", but he did not want the Broomstick-type, 20"er. Just something around 12-14" was in his wheelhouse. I had a small stash of Lamkin products and found a number of the SINK 13's. The length was good, shape was what he had in mind with a flat front, pistol-type shape, so we went for it.
The goal for the build was face-balanced heads on a trio of the same style, but using different materials. Not thinking that the grip choice would be a HUGE deal when determining the toe-hang, I simply used a shaft that was the correct tip diameter and was gripped, to test the hang, as the build progressed. The grip on this one was a PING man, nothing out of the ordinary. I crafted the heads, configured the necks and dialed them in, perfectly face balanced. Hooray!
THEN, I did the final assembly and slid on the SINK 13's............................they now hung at about 3:30 to 4 o'clock............WTH!??? After a few hours of cussing, doing the WTF Shuffle and a few other unmentionables, I called the shaft guys at Stability, as I was building with their product. They shrugged, but we came to the agreement that only one thing will cause the toe to drop.......more weight in front of that imaginary line down the center of the shaft, thru the head. BAM! A light went on. The SINK 13 has a fairly thick front to the grip and when I turned the front of the grip, to the back of the putter, spinning the shaft around, NOW I had negative toe hang. If I turned the flat front of the grip 90* to the normal location, BAM! Face-balanced.
So, it turned out that the weighting in that particular grip is substantial enough, with a heavy front bias, to really change the flow of the head and the toe-hang.
I'd type more and go into greater detail, but my fingers are tired, my back is killing me on this stool and I've got ball markers and divot tools to make for my wife's inventory.
Suffice to say, grips can make more of a difference than just vibration dampening and static weight. I'd never have believed that a grip could change toe hang. But, seeing is believing.
Next!
LaMont in AZ
 

bargolf

Well-known member
Lamont, You will see the same effect with certain grips and Seemore putter that have a vertical hang.

Lumpy can weigh in but I have heard a story that the Pingman grip was designed to reduce rotation in the stroke.
 

mattc

New member
I have a few more questions than answers right now but I think they're better questions. There's an interesting article from a few years back on Mygolfspy on this: https://mygolfspy.com/mygolfspy-labs-putter-grip-make-more-putts/

I don't think they got into the effect on toe-hang and how that affected the putt but the club path / face angle aspects might have hinted at it. Round vs flat grip results differed greatly.
 
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