Author Topic: shaft angle  (Read 868 times)

Ripple

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
shaft angle
« on: November 24, 2015, 07:08:51 PM »
curious if variations in shaft angle, especially with full offset necks, can impact face angle and roll ( i.e. hooking left)? 
i have a full offset putter with flatter lie and 5 loft that pulls left when with other putters( various head styles and lie/loft specs) i normally dont have this marked miss/roll pattern.  the shaft angle feels like the culprit.  i feel like i am aligned properly, but fighting a closed face.  I look to target and then find the ball almost curving left.  any thoughts?

rclarke1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1107
  • trying to get back on course......
Re: shaft angle
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2015, 07:46:38 PM »
I found closing my stance a touch with certain putters improved this dramatically.
It is different with face balanced putters.
Do some reading here:
http://puttertalk.com/community/index.php?board=125.0

Bruce has some great info on rotation you might find interesting.
Best Regards-
RC
Xenon X, Ingles .470, SRC blade
Mann MA66, Super Sport, Rattler
Byron GSS DH89, GSS 615 DW, Carbon 612, B17
Carbon Ming, GSS Trad XL, 303 SS Flat T
RJB7784, RJB8143, RJB7541

PJ

Re: shaft angle
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2015, 09:03:15 PM »
What is the offset of the other putters you are comparing this one to?  A putter with a full shaft offset will try to assume a position slightly closed to the path of your stroke, introducing a slight left bias.  Most players using a putter like this have made a corresponding adjustment to compensate for this.  For example, the suggestion from rclarke1 to assume a closed setup would tilt the path of your stroke to the right slightly.  So the goal would be a path slightly right (relative to target line as it comes into impact) and a face slightly closed (relative to path) to produce a face square to the target line at impact.

As an aside, you can't really "hook" a putt.  The direction the ball launches is dependent mainly on the face angle, with a small contribution from the path.  But once it is rolling it is just rolling on the ground - there is no side-spin component to make it curve.  Any curve comes only from the slope of the green and gravity pulling it down the slope, or possibly grain effects from the surface.. 
Scott Readman Concepts hand made, Head Speed shaft

Ripple

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: shaft angle
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2015, 10:58:50 PM »
I prefer full offset , more natural for me, my stroke is right hand dom., arc, open stance/shoulders.  If I stand square I typically go right, thus the open stance.
Most of my putters are 3/4 to full offset, various neck styles, weights, grips etc...
The putter I referenced has pencil neck, standard grip, no site lines/dots., 350g.  this putter was borne to rotate and release......something about the engineering that's a little different for me I guess.  I may try a midsize grip if I don't master it.  I have blade putters but haven't had this happen,
thx for feedback

bargolf

  • Section Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5252
    • barusga
    • BURNT EDGES CONSULTING
Re: shaft angle
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2015, 07:24:14 AM »
Was the putter built with 5 degrees of loft or did you bend it to that number?

If you bent the putter to add loft and did not change the grip you have closed the face relative to the grip.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2015, 07:26:03 AM by bargolf »
Byron Morgan Bombora In-Between Long Pipe
Byron Morgan DaKine Long Pipe
Staff Professional Burnt Edges Consulting
SLDR TP 9.5 TP
SLDR 3 14 degree TP
SLDR TP Hybrids 17 and 21
Nike VR Pro Blades 4-9 KBS Tour S
Clay Long Desig TM 50 and 56

dlam

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
Re: shaft angle
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2015, 11:49:58 AM »
Seems like the older ping putters from the 70s and 80s with more than full shaft offset (looks like 1.5 to 2 full offset) also had more shaft angle.
most plumbers neck and goose neck design nowadays seem  have about  full shaft offset with a standard shaft angle.
I find it easier to heat and bend a goose neck if I want to change the angle. With a plumblers neck its more difficult to do this.
I just find it easier to change the grip size and work with whatever shaft angle is present.

Ripple

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: shaft angle
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2015, 02:42:53 PM »
the putter was built to 5 loft.  unfortunately blade has no markings and both it and the grip are black so i can't see the grip alignment so easily, it may be slightly off can't tell.  moving the grip to left a tad i presume might be one corrective solution. 
is there such thing as a standard location for how a shaft handle should be aligned with top line or just personal preference?

PJ

Re: shaft angle
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2015, 10:40:41 PM »
Normally if there is a flat on the grip you would want that on top and under your thumbs, and it would ideally be exactly perpendicular to the putter face.  Grips don't always come from the factory mounted straight.  Yours could be crooked, or it could be straight and you might want to mount it crooked on purpose.  Here is a discussion on how to do this...

http://puttertalk.com/community/index.php?topic=43146.msg410914;topicseen#msg410914

There is no rule that you HAVE to have the flat under your thumbs.  I am right arm motive and have experimentied with mounting the flat parallel to the putter face, so the flat is against the right palm.  These days I use grips with no flat...a round profile.  These are never mounted crooked, even if you do it blindfolded.   ;)
Scott Readman Concepts hand made, Head Speed shaft