Author Topic: Anybody remember the Putter's Penny ?  (Read 1435 times)

CourtGolf

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Anybody remember the Putter's Penny ?
« on: January 07, 2015, 03:18:43 PM »
I've been going through old boxes in a storage shed and came across a lot of old golf trinkets and training aids that got put in boxes and stored away.

Thought I'd toss this one out and see if anyone remembered it.  The inventor, Bob McDonald, sent it to me back in 1996 as a putting training aid for those of us with Wandering Head and Eye Syndrome. 

The Penny is slightly smaller than the ball.  If your eyes are directly over the ball, you won't see it under the ball.  If you can see any of it, you can adjust your setup until it is completely out of sight.  I suppose that if you do not agree with the "eyes directly over the ball", you could find your best setup and use that part of the Penny to be consistent.

For the stroke, the idea is to keep the putter low.  Done properly, the Penny will slide on the ground and you will strike the center of the putter (horizontally, at least) instead of thinning the strike.

McDonald's practice tips say that the Penny will...
- help develop routine over the ball
- the consistent stroke frees up the mind to concentrate on reading the green and speed - reducing indecistion
- help get the ball in the "correct" position over the ball, allowing the body to take a more natural stance
- train you to keep the head still by looking for the Penny before looking for the ball - "Looking up moves the center of your swing and leads to offline putts."

Maybe I should have cleaned out these boxes a long time ago.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2015, 03:20:59 PM by CourtGolf »
"Don't do anything well that you don't want to do again." - Bob from "Becker"

CourtGolf

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Re: Anybody remember the Putter's Penny ?
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2015, 03:51:51 PM »
Not sure why I didn't think to do this before posting, but The Putter's Penny is still around. 

http://www.colkat.com/
"Don't do anything well that you don't want to do again." - Bob from "Becker"